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Posts Tagged ‘landscape’

The fells of Easedale rise up to the north and west of the Vale of Grasmere. Easedale itself is a lush area of green farmland fields where a number of mountain streams meet to form the beautiful Easedale Beck, which soon joins with the River Rothay just north of Grasmere village.

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A circular walk starting at Little Town in the Newlands Valley and climbing up to High Spy then descending to the base of Dale Head then the climb to its summit and on to Robinson. Despite the slightly hazy weather the views were spectacular and the walk invigorating.

The first image shows a pre-sunrise glow over Derwent Water with the town of Keswick at it’s eastern end. The second image is of the spectacular Cairn which graces the summit of High Spy, the third image is the view looking back into Little Town from Robinson.

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Along the top edge of the image is Rough Crags Ridge,  which is a series of Crags each with its own name; Swine Crag, Heron Crag, Eagle Crag, Rough Crag, Caspel Gate, Riggindale Crag and Long Stile which is a scramble to gain the heights of High Street (The only High Street without buildings or shops!) Named as such because of the old Roman road, the highest in the UK 2,690 feet above sea level, which runs along its course.

riggingdale2

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One of the many cascading waterfalls in the Cumbrian, Dovedale Valley, near Brotherswater. The light was quickly changing as the dark clouds rolled in from the West complete with a few short rain showers.

 

dovedalecascade2

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A view of Dove Crag, Hart Crag, Fairfield, The Step and Cofa Pike from the ridge of
Hartsop above How.

Although properly the long north east ridge of Hart Crag, Alfred Wainwright accorded
Hartsop above How the status of a separate fell in his Pictorial Guide to the
Lakeland Fells and that convention is followed here. The name, with the middle
word uncapitalised, is that used on Ordnance Survey maps and has wide support in
guidebooks, although it is sometimes hyphenated. Wainwright states that the local name
for the fell is Gill Crag.

A three mile ridge of high ground branches off north east from the Fairfield horseshoe at
Hart Crag. It turns gradually more northward, resembling a billhook in plan. To the north
is Deepdale, a long curving valley with a marshy and rather dismal character. The southern
boundary of Hartsop above How is formed by Dovedale, a picturesque valley of woodlands
and waterfalls. Both dales meet the main valley of Kirkstone, Goldrill Beck which flows
north through Patterdale to Ullswater.

morningsunlight

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In the calm of the past few days, with early morning mists lying on the surface of Ullswater, with the water like glass and affording some wonderful reflections of the surrounding scenery; it has certainly been a pleasure to be out with the camera in the early morning light.

Below is an image of a misty bay on Ullswater near Howtown on the Southern side of the lake, the sun was just breaking the horizon and beginning to burn off the mists lying in the valleys and over the lakes. Small amounts of Autumn colour are beginning to punch through the greenery of late summer and adding further warmth and colour to the scene.

mistyreflections1024

After parking on The Coombs below Hallin Fell, I began the trek towards the ascent of Sleet Fell which would eventually take me to High Dodd, Place Fell and the Patterdale Common. On the ascent to Sleet Fell and stopped and looked back towards Hallin Fell and below is the scene which I gazed upon.

hallinfell1024

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Another image from early Friday morning at Ullswater in Cumbria, this time at Howtown with moored boats and rising mists, taken just  minutes before sunrise which didn’t really penetrate the mists and cloud.
boatshowtown

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