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One of the best known features of Great Langdale are the Langdale Pikes, a group of peaks on the northern side of the dale. From below, they appear as a sharp rocky ridge, though they are only precipitous on their southern side; to the north, the land sweeps gently to High Raise, the parent peak of the range. The Pikes themselves include (from west to east) Pike of Stickle, Loft Crag, Harrison Stickle and Pavey Ark.

Stickle Tarn
Stickle Tarn is a small lake near Harrison Stickle in Lake District, England.The tarn was enlarged by the building of a stone dam in 1838 and is used to supply water for the inhabitants of Langdale.

Harrison Stickle
Harrison Stickle is the high point of the Langdale Pikes and its crags fall south and east from the summit, presenting an arresting view from the valley floor 2,000 ft below, or from further afield. To the north, the main ridge of the central fells passes over Thunacar Knott before climbing to High Raise. The craggy eastern face of this ridge continues north as far as Harrison’s near neighbour, Pavey Ark, visually the most impressive face in the area. The south western border of Harrison Stickle is formed by the deep ravine of Dungeon Ghyll, which cuts through the parapet of the Langdale Pikes and into the lower hinterland of Harrison Combe. Across the Ghyll westwards are Thorn Crag, Loft Crag and finally Pike of Stickle. Below the steep eastern face of Harrison Stickle lie Stickle Tarn and its Ghyll, thus ensuring that all drainage from the fell is to Great Langdale. The tarn is a water filled corrie about 50 ft deep, this being enhanced by a dam. The water is used for public consumption in Great Langdale.

Pavey Ark
Pavey Ark is 700 m (2,297 ft) high. The main face is a little over a quarter of a mile across and drops about 400 ft. To the south west it merges into the crags of Harrison Stickle, while the northern end peters out into the valley of Bright Beck. Stickle Tarn is wholly within the territory of the Ark, a corrie tarn which has been dammed to create additional capacity. The stone faced barage is low enough not to spoil the character of the pool, and the water is used for public consumption in the hotels and homes below. The tarn has a depth of around 50 ft.

www.davidlewins.co.uk

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Eyemouth (historically spelt Aymouth; Scottish Gaelic: Inbhir Eighe) is a small town and parish in Berwickshire, in the Scottish Borders. It is two miles east of the main north-south A1 road and just 8 miles north of Berwick-upon-Tweed.

The town’s name comes from its location at the mouth of the Eye Water. The Berwickshire coastline consists of high cliffs over deep clear water, with sandy coves and picturesque harbours. A fishing port, Eyemouth celebrates an annual Herring Queen Festival. Notable buildings in the town include Gunsgreen House and a cemetery watch house built to stand guard against the Resurrectionists (body snatchers). Many of the features of a traditional fishing village are preserved in the narrow streets and vennels – giving shelter from the sea and well suited to the smuggling tradition of old.

www.davidlewins.co.uk

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Durham Castle was originally built in the 11th century as a projection of the Norman king’s power in the north of England, as the population of England in the north remained “wild and fickle” following the disruption of the Norman Conquest in 1066. It is an excellent example of the early motte and bailey castles favoured by the Normans. The holder of the office of the Bishop of Durham was appointed by the King to exercise royal authority on his behalf: the Castle was his seat.

It remained the Bishop’s palace for the Bishops of Durham until the Bishops made Bishop Auckland their primary residence and the castle was converted into a college.

www.davidlewins.co.uk

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This impressive castle sits on a basalt outcrop overlooking the Farne Islands and Lindisfarne on the heritage coast in North Northumberland.

This is exactly how it was, this image has not been manipulated or had saturation added, in fact the reverse, I actually desaturated it by about 25%.

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Another image from early Friday morning at Ullswater in Cumbria, this time at Howtown with moored boats and rising mists, taken just  minutes before sunrise which didn’t really penetrate the mists and cloud.
boatshowtown

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Cumbria is always different, sometimes moody with cloud and rain, sleet or snow or sunshine and showers.  This morning however, it was low mist hanging over the lakes and the sides of the hills and mountains. I approached Ullswater with the intention of continuing straight on to Pooley Bridge and up to Martindale. As I approached the junction and indicated to turn left, the scene which greeted me was just too beautiful not to stop the car and grab the camera and tripod. The lake was bathed in early morning light with a half moon still lighting the scene, rising mists were coming off the water and mist was hanging from the hills. I quickly found somewhere to park and photographed this magical scene.

boathouse

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Taken a few weeks ago and the only reason why it was not added sooner is simply that I hurt my spine getting down to this waterfall and have been recuperating ever since. Not an easy waterfall to get to unless you walk part of the Pennine Way, I chose to do it the quick way at sunset time and hurt my spine in the process of climbing down the rocky sides of the waterfall to reach the bottom.

The waterfall is fed by Cow Green Reservoir (which is part of the river Tees) in Upper Teesdale and eventully leads down to the High Force also in the Teesdale Valley.

cauldronsnout1

cauldronsnout2

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