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The fells of Easedale rise up to the north and west of the Vale of Grasmere. Easedale itself is a lush area of green farmland fields where a number of mountain streams meet to form the beautiful Easedale Beck, which soon joins with the River Rothay just north of Grasmere village.

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One of the best known features of Great Langdale are the Langdale Pikes, a group of peaks on the northern side of the dale. From below, they appear as a sharp rocky ridge, though they are only precipitous on their southern side; to the north, the land sweeps gently to High Raise, the parent peak of the range. The Pikes themselves include (from west to east) Pike of Stickle, Loft Crag, Harrison Stickle and Pavey Ark.

Stickle Tarn
Stickle Tarn is a small lake near Harrison Stickle in Lake District, England.The tarn was enlarged by the building of a stone dam in 1838 and is used to supply water for the inhabitants of Langdale.

Harrison Stickle
Harrison Stickle is the high point of the Langdale Pikes and its crags fall south and east from the summit, presenting an arresting view from the valley floor 2,000 ft below, or from further afield. To the north, the main ridge of the central fells passes over Thunacar Knott before climbing to High Raise. The craggy eastern face of this ridge continues north as far as Harrison’s near neighbour, Pavey Ark, visually the most impressive face in the area. The south western border of Harrison Stickle is formed by the deep ravine of Dungeon Ghyll, which cuts through the parapet of the Langdale Pikes and into the lower hinterland of Harrison Combe. Across the Ghyll westwards are Thorn Crag, Loft Crag and finally Pike of Stickle. Below the steep eastern face of Harrison Stickle lie Stickle Tarn and its Ghyll, thus ensuring that all drainage from the fell is to Great Langdale. The tarn is a water filled corrie about 50 ft deep, this being enhanced by a dam. The water is used for public consumption in Great Langdale.

Pavey Ark
Pavey Ark is 700 m (2,297 ft) high. The main face is a little over a quarter of a mile across and drops about 400 ft. To the south west it merges into the crags of Harrison Stickle, while the northern end peters out into the valley of Bright Beck. Stickle Tarn is wholly within the territory of the Ark, a corrie tarn which has been dammed to create additional capacity. The stone faced barage is low enough not to spoil the character of the pool, and the water is used for public consumption in the hotels and homes below. The tarn has a depth of around 50 ft.

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Easedale tarn lies in a high Lakeland valley and is about a two mile walk from Grasmere up a moderately easy path which follows the course of Sour Milk Ghyll. The hanging valley, in which Easdale Tarn lies, has the appearance of a crater, en-closed by steep hillsides that rise on the right to Tarn Crag and on the left, Castle How and Blea Rigg. The lake fills the vast hollow, draining water from the surrounding hills and releasing it at its narrow mouth into Sourmilk Ghyll. Around the lake lie grassy hillocks, piles of glacial debris left by the retreating ice as it melted some 20,000 years ago.

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Early morning Derwent Water in the English Lake Distirct, Cumbria on a cold, misty start to the day and just before the mist oblitorated the morning light on the Western horizon.

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The newest crossing over the River Tees, Infinity Bridge instantly changed the skyline over Stockton UK. The arches of Infinity Bridge were lifted into place in 2008.

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Along the top edge of the image is Rough Crags Ridge,  which is a series of Crags each with its own name; Swine Crag, Heron Crag, Eagle Crag, Rough Crag, Caspel Gate, Riggindale Crag and Long Stile which is a scramble to gain the heights of High Street (The only High Street without buildings or shops!) Named as such because of the old Roman road, the highest in the UK 2,690 feet above sea level, which runs along its course.

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At 582m high Haystacks offers some fine views of Buttermere, Crummock Water and Ennerdale Water and was one of the famous hiking guide author Wainwright’s favourite peaks. Innominate Tarn is a small tarn in the northern Lake District National Park in England. It is situated at 520 metres above sea level, near the summit of Haystacks. It was formerly known as Loaf Tarn, which referred to the small islands of peat in the tarn resembling loaves.

The tarn is the location where Alfred Wainwright’s ashes were scattered. He had expressed this wish in A Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells Volume 7: The Western Fells, and in other publications.

“All I ask for, at the end, is a last long resting place by the side of Innominate Tarn, on Haystacks, where the water gently laps the gravelly shore and the heather blooms and Pillar and Gable keep unfailing watch. A quiet place, a lonely place. I shall go to it, for the last time, and be carried: someone who knew me in life will take me and empty me out of a little box and leave me there alone. And if you, dear reader, should get a bit of grit in your boot as you are crossing Haystacks in the years to come, please treat it with respect. It might be me.”

~ Alfred Wainwright – from “Memoirs of a Fellwalker” (1993)

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